22 gorgeous colourised images from the 20th century – check out the ‘Al’ Capone & Grace Kelly images

Sam Dickson
 
Unemployed men hanging out on the street in San Francisco, California (April 1939).Photo: Dorothea Lange, Library of Congress.
 
 
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As you may have gathered by now, all of us here at TVN are big fans of colourisation. Some are of the view that back then, life was black and white – of course it wasn’t, we just didn’t have the tech to take colour images. Of that’s also a bit of an old wife’s tale – we did have the tech but it was very expensive. The wonderful collection here is by Marina Amaral. Marina has a great website and FB page and you can find all her details below. As you will see, Marina also takes on private commissions and has colourised many family images for people:

One day I decided to combine my fascination with history and skill using Photoshop; the combination was magical. I started to restore and put color into photo’s that were originally black and white, allowing people to see history from a new and colorful perspective. Each photo is made to be realistic by recognizing the value behind each image, respecting and preserving their stories, paying attention to the finer details and maintaining the original essence in each one.

Every completed work has gone through long and in depth research, and is supported by the opinions of experts in each particular area if necessary, to faithfully reproduce the original colors and atmosphere. My work ranges from simple portraits to complex and detailed images, taken from various historical periods covering a wide range of topics. 

Color has the power to bring the life back to the most important moments.

Coloring black and white photos is an art that requires a deep work of research, analysis of each object to make it be as realistic as possible, historical knowledge and enough respect to value and preserve every detail in each story. It is a complex process able to transport us to anywhere. When we look at the photo in color, we can easily have the feeling that we are living that moment again. You can follow Marina on Facebook and her website www.marinamaral.com 

Franklin Delano Roosevelt, commonly known as FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the President of the United States from 1933 to 1945. A Democrat, he won a record four presidential elections and dominated his party for many years as a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the United States during a time of worldwide economic depression and total war. His program for relief, recovery and reform, known as the New Deal, involved a great expansion of the role of the federal government in the economy. As a dominant leader of the Democratic Party, he built the New Deal Coalition that brought together and united labor unions, big city machines, white ethnics, African Americans, and rural white Southerners in support of the party. The Coalition significantly realigned American politics after 1932, creating the Fifth Party System and defining American liberalism throughout the middle third of the 20th century.
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, commonly known as FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the President of the United States from 1933 to 1945. A Democrat, he won a record four presidential elections and dominated his party for many years as a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the United States during a time of worldwide economic depression and total war. His program for relief, recovery and reform, known as the New Deal, involved a great expansion of the role of the federal government in the economy. As a dominant leader of the Democratic Party, he built the New Deal Coalition that brought together and united labor unions, big city machines, white ethnics, African Americans, and rural white Southerners in support of the party. The Coalition significantly realigned American politics after 1932, creating the Fifth Party System and defining American liberalism throughout the middle third of the 20th century.

 

Two brothers meet for a Christmas reunion after having been separated by the Berlin Wall (at this point only two years old). It was the first meeting of East/West relatives allowed by the East German government following the wall’s construction. West Berlin - 1963
Two brothers meet for a Christmas reunion after having been separated by the Berlin Wall (at this point only two years old). It was the first meeting of East/West relatives allowed by the East German government following the wall’s construction. West Berlin – 1963

 

 Unemployed men hanging out on the street in San Francisco, California (April 1939). Photo: Dorothea Lange, Library of Congress.

Unemployed men hanging out on the street in San Francisco, California (April 1939).
Photo: Dorothea Lange, Library of Congress.

 

Execution of SS concentration camp physician Eduard Krebsach who was convicted of war crimes at the Mauthausen trial. Krebsbach was an SS concentration camp physician who initiated the mass execution of ill and unfit prisoners by heart injections. Krebsbach often inspected the prisoners and conducted selections for execution. A former inmate recalled Krebsbach's actions during such an inspection: "As the senior SS doctor in the camp, Dr Krebsbach sometimes came to block 5 and had the still surviving Jews paraded before him. He then asked if any of them were doctors. If there were, he would say: 'You Jewish pig, you’re just an abortionist.' The next day they were done away with by the kapos. If a Jewish inmate was lying on the floor with a broken limb - a not uncommon occurrence at work - he was usually thrown over a wall by a kapo. If Dr Krebsbach were passing, he would say ironically: 'Yes, this broken foot is a hopeless case.' "Josef Herzler, former Mauthausen inmate" Dr. Krebsbach´s career at KZ Mauthausen-Gusen ended when he shot Josef Breitenfellner, a soldier from Langenstein who served in the German Army. Krebsbach shot this vacationing young man at his private home, because he and his friends disturbed Krebsbach in the night of May 22, 1943.
Execution of SS concentration camp physician Eduard Krebsach who was convicted of war crimes at the Mauthausen trial. Krebsbach was an SS concentration camp physician who initiated the mass execution of ill and unfit prisoners by heart injections.
Krebsbach often inspected the prisoners and conducted selections for execution. A former inmate recalled Krebsbach’s actions during such an inspection: “As the senior SS doctor in the camp, Dr Krebsbach sometimes came to block 5 and had the still surviving Jews paraded before him. He then asked if any of them were doctors. If there were, he would say: ‘You Jewish pig, you’re just an abortionist.’ The next day they were done away with by the kapos. If a Jewish inmate was lying on the floor with a broken limb – a not uncommon occurrence at work – he was usually thrown over a wall by a kapo. If Dr Krebsbach were passing, he would say ironically: ‘Yes, this broken foot is a hopeless case.’ “Josef Herzler, former Mauthausen inmate”
Dr. Krebsbach´s career at KZ Mauthausen-Gusen ended when he shot Josef Breitenfellner, a soldier from Langenstein who served in the German Army. Krebsbach shot this vacationing young man at his private home, because he and his friends disturbed Krebsbach in the night of May 22, 1943.

 

Broad Street, New York, 1905.
Broad Street, New York, 1905.

 

James Byron Dean (February 8, 1931 – September 30, 1955) was an American actor. He is a cultural icon of teenage disillusionment and social estrangement, as expressed in the title of his most celebrated film, Rebel Without a Cause (1955), in which he starred as troubled teenager Jim Stark. The other two roles that defined his stardom were loner Cal Trask in East of Eden (1955) and surly ranch hand Jett Rink in Giant (1956). Dean's enduring fame and popularity rest on his performances in only these three films. Dean's premature death in a car crash cemented his legendary status. He became the first actor to receive a posthumous Academy Award nomination for Best Actor, and remains the only actor to have had two posthumous acting nominations. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked him the 17th best male movie star of Golden Age Hollywood in AFI's 100 Years...100 Stars list.
James Byron Dean (February 8, 1931 – September 30, 1955) was an American actor. He is a cultural icon of teenage disillusionment and social estrangement, as expressed in the title of his most celebrated film, Rebel Without a Cause (1955), in which he starred as troubled teenager Jim Stark. The other two roles that defined his stardom were loner Cal Trask in East of Eden (1955) and surly ranch hand Jett Rink in Giant (1956). Dean’s enduring fame and popularity rest on his performances in only these three films.
Dean’s premature death in a car crash cemented his legendary status. He became the first actor to receive a posthumous Academy Award nomination for Best Actor, and remains the only actor to have had two posthumous acting nominations. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked him the 17th best male movie star of Golden Age Hollywood in AFI’s 100 Years…100 Stars list.

 

Grace Patricia Kelly (November 12, 1929 – September 14, 1982) was an American actress who, after marrying Prince Rainier III, became Princess of Monaco. After embarking on an acting career in 1950, at the age of 20, Kelly appeared in New York City theatrical productions and more than 40 episodes of live drama productions broadcast during the early 1950s Golden Age of Television. In October 1953, she gained stardom from her performance in the film Mogambo. It won her a Golden Globe Award and an Academy Award nomination in 1954. She had leading roles in five films, including The Country Girl, for which her deglamorized performance earned her an Academy Award for Best Actress. Other films include High Noon (1952) with Gary Cooper, Dial M for Murder (1954) with Ray Milland, Rear Window (1954) with James Stewart and To Catch a Thief (1955) with Cary Grant, and High Society (1956) with Frank Sinatra and Bing Crosby. Kelly retired from acting at the age of 26 to marry Rainier and began her duties as Princess of Monaco. They had three children: Caroline, Albert, and Stéphanie. She retained her American roots, maintaining dual U.S. and Monégasque citizenship. She died on September 14, 1982, a day after suffering a stroke while driving, causing her to crash.
Grace Patricia Kelly (November 12, 1929 – September 14, 1982) was an American actress who, after marrying Prince Rainier III, became Princess of Monaco.
After embarking on an acting career in 1950, at the age of 20, Kelly appeared in New York City theatrical productions and more than 40 episodes of live drama productions broadcast during the early 1950s Golden Age of Television. In October 1953, she gained stardom from her performance in the film Mogambo. It won her a Golden Globe Award and an Academy Award nomination in 1954. She had leading roles in five films, including The Country Girl, for which her deglamorized performance earned her an Academy Award for Best Actress. Other films include High Noon (1952) with Gary Cooper, Dial M for Murder (1954) with Ray Milland, Rear Window (1954) with James Stewart and To Catch a Thief (1955) with Cary Grant, and High Society (1956) with Frank Sinatra and Bing Crosby.
Kelly retired from acting at the age of 26 to marry Rainier and began her duties as Princess of Monaco. They had three children: Caroline, Albert, and Stéphanie. She retained her American roots, maintaining dual U.S. and Monégasque citizenship. She died on September 14, 1982, a day after suffering a stroke while driving, causing her to crash.

 

The Banality of Evil: British ID photographs of Bergen-Belsen guards awaiting trial at Celle in August 1945. Herta Ehlert was sentenced to 15 years imprisonment.
The Banality of Evil: British ID photographs of Bergen-Belsen guards awaiting trial at Celle in August 1945. Herta Ehlert was sentenced to 15 years imprisonment.

 

2 am February 12, 1908. Papers just out. Boys starting out on morning round, New York.
2 am February 12, 1908. Papers just out. Boys starting out on morning round, New York.

 

At the German concentration camp at Wobbelin, many inmates were found by the U.S. Ninth Army in pitiful condition. Here one of them breaks out in tears when he finds he is not leaving with the first group to the hospital.
At the German concentration camp at Wobbelin, many inmates were found by the U.S. Ninth Army in pitiful condition. Here one of them breaks out in tears when he finds he is not leaving with the first group to the hospital.