Kayaker stumbles across a 110-year-old ghost ship on the Ohio River

 
 
 
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It was another wonderful day for the kayakers as they were cruising through the forest. Yet they certainly did not expect to discover a ghost ship that was over a century old.

Shockingly, as they cruised along the Ohio River, they discovered the amazing sight of an abandoned vessel. Even though the pictures themselves were really neat, they did a little bit more research about the ship.

James Malott
James Malott  Photo Credit

It turned out that they had found a ship with a proud history within the United States of America. The ship was initially crafted by a Delaware ship maker named Pusey and Jones. The ship manufacturer was started by Mr. Joshua Pusey and his partner John Jones in the city of Wilmington.

James Malott
James Malott Photo Credit

They rented an area from a whaling company that was positioned through the Pennsylvania Railroad. In the year 1851, the company bought an interest then changed its name to Betts, Pusey, Jones & Seal. Three years later, their bet paid off, and they constructed the first iron-hulled sail boat in the United States. The company built a vessel that took the crown at America’s Cup.

James Malott
James Malott Photo Credit

It was the first steel yacht to ever take home the crown.  In 1887, the company built the first steel-hulled yacht to win the America’s Cup, Volunteer. Naturally, the company caught the attention of the of man name J. Maxwell.

He was a railroad executive of the same Pennsylvania Railroad that Pusey and Jones were positioned next to. And although he was a businessman, one of his true passions was yachting. Maxwell won the 1907 King’s Cup with his ship Queen in a race against Commodore Vanderbilt.

The ship was initially constructed two years into the 20th century and was created as a yacht for J. Maxwell who was a renowned railroad executive.  It first set sail in the second week of April in the year 1902 where it stayed faithful until its first change of ownership.

Just before World War 1, the Celt was bought by a gentleman named Manton B. Metcalf and was happily used under the new name of Sachem.

But when the war broke out in 1914, Germany’s key strategy to defeat the British was to be able to stop the resources from North America from being delivered to the British Empire. Germany was trying to starve and collapse Britain’s economy.

James Malott
James Malott Photo Credit

Germany caught wind of the United States entering the war and they embarked on a mission to cut off supplies between the two Allies.

Germany believed they had the advantage because of their famous submarines, named the U-Boats. Germany patrolled the Atlantic trying to send any shipment headed towards Britain to the bottom of the ocean.

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