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Victorian Gentlemen and Fashion- Vintage photos show Victorian Men with Stove Pipe Hats

Ian Smith

During the 1840s, men wore tight-fitting, calf length frock coats and a waistcoat or vest. The vests were single- or double-breasted, with shawl or notched collars, and might be finished in double points at the lowered waist. For more formal occasions, a cutaway morning coat was worn with light trousers during the daytime, and a dark tail coat and trousers was worn in the evening. The shirts were made of linen or cotton with low collars, occasionally turned down, and were worn with wide cravats or neck ties. Trousers had fly fronts, and breeches were used for formal functions and when horseback riding. Men wore top hats, with wide brims in sunny weather.

During the 1850s, men started wearing shirts with high upstanding or turnover collars and four-in-hand neckties tied in a bow, or tied in a knot with the pointed ends sticking out like “wings”. The upper-class continued to wear top hats, and bowler hats were worn by the working class.

 

Stove-Pipe Hat – A Favorite Fashion Style for Gentlemen from Victorian Era (22)

 

Stove-Pipe Hat – A Favorite Fashion Style for Gentlemen from Victorian Era (21)

 

Stove-Pipe Hat – A Favorite Fashion Style for Gentlemen from Victorian Era (20)

 

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In the 1860s, men started wearing wider neckties that were tied in a bow or looped into a loose knot and fastened with a stickpin. Frock coats were shortened to knee-length and were worn for business, while the mid-thigh length sack coat slowly displaced the frock coat for less-formal occasions. Top hats briefly became the very tall “stovepipe” shape, but a variety of other hat shapes were popular.

Between the latter part of 18th century and the early part 19th century felted beaver fur was slowly replaced by silk “hatter’s plush”, though the silk topper met with resistance from those who preferred the beaver hat. The 1840s and the 1850s saw it reach its most extreme form, with ever higher crowns and narrow brims. The stovepipe hat was a variety with mostly straight sides, while one with slightly convex sides was called the “chimney pot”.

During the 1870s, three-piece suits grew in popularity along with patterned fabrics for shirts. Neckties were the four-in-hand and, later, the Ascot ties. A narrow ribbon tie was an alternative for tropical climates, especially in the Americas. Both frock coats and sack coats became shorter. Flat straw boaters were worn when boating.

Stove-Pipe Hat – A Favorite Fashion Style for Gentlemen from Victorian Era (14)

 

Stove-Pipe Hat – A Favorite Fashion Style for Gentlemen from Victorian Era (13)

 

Stove-Pipe Hat – A Favorite Fashion Style for Gentlemen from Victorian Era (12)

 

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Stove-Pipe Hat – A Favorite Fashion Style for Gentlemen from Victorian Era (10)

 

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Stove-Pipe Hat – A Favorite Fashion Style for Gentlemen from Victorian Era (8)

During the 1880s, formal evening dress remained a dark tail coat and trousers with a dark waistcoat, a white bow tie, and a shirt with a winged collar. In mid-decade, the dinner jacket or tuxedo, was used in more relaxed formal occasions. The Norfolk jacket and tweed or woolen breeches were used for rugged outdoor pursuits such as shooting. Knee-length topcoats, often with contrasting velvet or fur collars, and calf-length overcoats were worn in winter. Men’s shoes had higher heels and a narrow toe.Starting from the 1890s, the blazer was introduced, and was worn for sports, sailing, and other casual activities.

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William Sidney Mount, full length portrait, facing left, wearing top hat and holding a coat.Source

 

 

 

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Stove-Pipe Hat – A Favorite Fashion Style for Gentlemen from Victorian Era (1)

Throughout much of the Victorian era most men wore fairly short hair. This was often accompanied by various forms of facial hair including moustaches, side-burns, and full beards. A clean-shaven face did not come back into fashion until the end of the 1880s and early 1890s.

Distinguishing what men really wore from what was marketed to them in periodicals and advertisements is problematic, as reliable records do not exist.