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Beautiful color photos show Elvis Presley as a young man

Ian Smith

There are plenty of reasons why he was and remains “The King.”  Some of those reasons, of course, are his authentic and gentle voice, his effortlessly cool appearance, his revolutionary dance moves and sexual magnetism.

Presley was born on January 8, 1935, in Tupelo, Mississippi, the son of Gladys Love (née Smith; April 25, 1912 – August 14, 1958) and Vernon Elvis Presley (April 10, 1916 – June 26, 1979), in the two-room shotgun house built by Vernon’s father in preparation for the child’s birth. Jesse Garon Presley, his identical twin brother, was delivered stillborn 35 minutes before him.As an only child, Presley became close to both parents and formed an especially close bond with his mother. The family attended an Assembly of God church, where he found his initial musical inspiration.

Presley’s ancestry was primarily a Western European mix, including Scots-Irish, Scottish, German,and some French Norman. Gladys’s great-great-grandmother, Morning Dove White, was possibly a Cherokee Native American.Gladys was regarded by relatives and friends as the dominant member of the small family. Vernon moved from one odd job to the next, evidencing little ambition.The family often relied on help from neighbors and government food assistance. The Presleys survived the F5 tornado in the 1936 Tupelo–Gainesville tornado outbreak. In 1938, they lost their home after Vernon was found guilty of kiting a check written by the landowner, Orville S. Bean, the dairy farmer and cattle-and-hog broker for whom he then worked. He was jailed for eight months, and Gladys and Elvis moved in with relatives.

 

To honor the king we found rare color photos from private collections and decided to share them with you. Long Live the King!

Elvis Presley 1956

Elvis Presley 1956

 

August 7, 1954,

August 7, 1954,

 

ELVIS in Blue Hawaii (1961)

ELVIS in Blue Hawaii (1961)

In September 1941, Presley entered first grade at East Tupelo Consolidated, where his instructors regarded him as “average”.He was encouraged to enter a singing contest after impressing his schoolteacher with a rendition of Red Foley’s country song “Old Shep” during morning prayers. The contest, held at the Mississippi-Alabama Fair and Dairy Show on October 3, 1945, was his first public performance: dressed as a cowboy, the ten-year-old Presley stood on a chair to reach the microphone and sang “Old Shep”. He recalled placing fifth.A few months later, Presley received his first guitar for his birthday; he had hoped for something else—by different accounts, either a bicycle or a rifle.Over the following year, he received basic guitar lessons from two of his uncles and the new pastor at the family’s church. Presley recalled, “I took the guitar, and I watched people, and I learned to play a little bit. But I would never sing in public. I was very shy about it.”

Entering a new school, Milam, for sixth grade in September 1946, Presley was regarded as a loner. The following year, he began bringing his guitar in on a daily basis. He played and sang during lunchtime, and was often teased as a “trashy” kid who played hillbilly music. The family was by then living in a largely African-American neighborhood.A devotee of Mississippi Slim’s show on the Tupelo radio station WELO, Presley was described as “crazy about music” by Slim’s younger brother, a classmate of Presley’s, who often took him into the station. Slim supplemented Presley’s guitar tuition by demonstrating chord techniques. When his protégé was 12 years old, Slim scheduled him for two on-air performances. Presley was overcome by stage fright the first time, but succeeded in performing the following week.

Elvis in the Army

Elvis in the Army

 

Elvis in Uniform

Elvis in Uniform

 

Elvis on the set of Charro

Elvis on the set of Charro

 

Elvis Presley Backstage at Ellis Auditorium Holiday on Ice March 9, 1962.

Elvis Presley Backstage at Ellis Auditorium Holiday on Ice March 9, 1962.

 

 

Elvis Presley Memphis Fairgrounds, Summer 1962.

Elvis Presley Memphis Fairgrounds, Summer 1962.

 

Elvis Presley - RCA Studio One, Memphis, Tennessee - July 2, 1956

Elvis Presley – RCA Studio One, Memphis, Tennessee – July 2, 1956

 

 

 

Elvis Presley .

Elvis Presley .

 

Elvis Presley '68

Elvis Presley ’68

 

Elvis Presley 1961 Elvis at the Coco Palms Resort -

Elvis Presley 1961 Elvis at the Coco Palms Resort –

 

Elvis Presley at Concert

Elvis Presley at Concert

 

Elvis Presley at Graceland, Memphis, Tennessee, circa 1957

Elvis Presley at Graceland, Memphis, Tennessee, circa 1957

 

In November 1948, the family moved to Memphis, Tennessee. After residing for nearly a year in rooming houses, they were granted a two-bedroom apartment in the public housing complex known as the Lauderdale Courts. Enrolled at L. C. Humes High School, Presley received only a C in music in eighth grade. When his music teacher told him he had no aptitude for singing, he brought in his guitar the next day and sang a recent hit, “Keep Them Cold Icy Fingers Off Me”, in an effort to prove otherwise. A classmate later recalled that the teacher “agreed that Elvis was right when he said that she didn’t appreciate his kind of singing.” He was usually too shy to perform openly, and was occasionally bullied by classmates who viewed him as a “mama’s boy”. In 1950, he began practicing guitar regularly under the tutelage of Jesse Lee Denson, a neighbor two-and-a-half years his senior. They and three other boys—including two future rockabilly pioneers, brothers Dorsey and Johnny Burnette—formed a loose musical collective that played frequently around the Courts. That September, he began ushering at Loew’s State Theater.Other jobs followed, including Precision Tool, Loew’s again, and MARL Metal Products.

During his junior year, Presley began to stand out more among his classmates, largely because of his appearance: he grew out his sideburns and styled his hair with rose oil and Vaseline. On his own time, he would head down to Beale Street, the heart of Memphis’s thriving blues scene, and gaze longingly at the wild, flashy clothes in the windows of Lansky Brothers. By his senior year, he was wearing them.Overcoming his reticence about performing outside the Lauderdale Courts, he competed in Humes’s Annual “Minstrel” show in April 1953. Singing and playing guitar, he opened with “Till I Waltz Again with You”, a recent hit for Teresa Brewer. Presley recalled that the performance did much for his reputation: “I wasn’t popular in school … I failed music—only thing I ever failed. And then they entered me in this talent show … when I came onstage I heard people kind of rumbling and whispering and so forth, ’cause nobody knew I even sang. It was amazing how popular I became after that.”

 

Elvis Presley at his home, Graceland, in Memphis, Tennessee, circa 1955

Elvis Presley at his home, Graceland, in Memphis, Tennessee, circa 1955

 

Elvis Presley at Red Wests Wedding

Elvis Presley at Red Wests Wedding

Presley, who never received formal music training or learned to read music, studied and played by ear. He also frequented record stores with jukeboxes and listening booths. He knew all of Hank Snow’s songs,and he loved records by other country singers such as Roy Acuff, Ernest Tubb, Ted Daffan, Jimmie Rodgers, Jimmie Davis, and Bob Wills. The Southern gospel singer Jake Hess, one of his favorite performers, was a significant influence on his ballad-singing style.He was a regular audience member at the monthly All-Night Singings downtown, where many of the white gospel groups that performed reflected the influence of African-American spiritual music. He adored the music of black gospel singer Sister Rosetta Tharpe. Like some of his peers, he may have attended blues venues—of necessity, in the segregated South, on only the nights designated for exclusively white audiences. He certainly listened to the regional radio stations, such as WDIA-AM, that played “race records”: spirituals, blues, and the modern, backbeat-heavy sound of rhythm and blues. Many of his future recordings were inspired by local African-American musicians such as Arthur Crudup and Rufus Thomas. B.B. King recalled that he had known Presley before he was popular, when they both used to frequent Beale Street. By the time he graduated from high school in June 1953, Presley had already singled out music as his future

Elvis Presley riding a Triumph Bonneville Motorcycle in 'Stay Away Joe' Movie Card. 1968

Elvis Presley riding a Triumph Bonneville Motorcycle in ‘Stay Away Joe’ Movie Card. 1968

 

Elvis Presley

Elvis Presley

 

Elvis Reads a Magazine

Elvis Reads a Magazine

 

elvis_cap

 

elvis_sitting_movie_set

 

 

Priscilla and Elvis Presley