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USS New York, built with 24 tons of steel salvaged from the World Trade Center to commemorate the victims of 9/11

Nick Knight

USS New York the fifth San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock, is the fifth ship of the United States Navy to be named after the state of New York. New York has a crew of 360 and can carry up to 700 Marines. It is notable for using a symbolic amount of steel salvaged from the World Trade Center after it was destroyed in the September 11 attacks.

The ship is the first to be designed fully from the CAD-screen up to support all of the Marines’ primary mobility capabilities—Landing Craft Air Cushion and MV-22B Osprey.

Shortly after 11 September 2001, Governor of New York George E. Pataki wrote a letter to Secretary of the Navy Gordon R. England requesting that the navy bestow the name “New York” on a surface warship involved in the War on Terrorism in honor of the victims of the September 11 attacks according to wiki

Robert took this shot from 12th street on 6th ave. Photo Credit: Robert J Fisch

Robert took this shot from 12th street on 6th ave. Photo Credit: Robert J Fisch

The contract to build New York was awarded to Northrop Grumman Ship Systems ofNew Orleans, Louisiana, in 2003. New York was under construction in New Orleans at the time of Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

7.5 short tons (6.8 t) of the steel used in the ship’s construction came from the rubble of the World Trade Center; this represents less than one thousandth of the total weight of the ship. The steel was melted down at Amite Foundry and Machine in Amite, Louisiana, to cast the ship’s bow section. It was poured into the molds on 9 September 2003, with 7 short tons (6.4 t) cast to form the ship’s “stem bar”—part of the ship’s bow. The shipyard workers reportedly treated it with “reverence usually accorded to religious relics”, gently touching it as they walked by. One worker delayed his retirement after 40 years of working to be part of the project.

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