Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Instagram
 

Cold War nuclear bomb shelter converted into a luxury home, yours for $5 million

Ian Harvey

A valuable London home that was built on the site of a concealed Cold War bunker is now on the market for $5 million. Fit for any individual that enjoys luxury and history, the classy pad is in the wealthy Chislehurst area, south-east London.

This home has five bedrooms, and boasts an A-shaped glass roof, and plenty of space. The bomb shelter was created by the government in the early 1950s as a place from which to run the country if there was nuclear warfare, but it was never required.

1

1

Instead was neglected for years until it was converted into a home known as the Glass House.

The Regional Control Center was one of the four bunkers created at the rise of the Cold War. It was amply equipped with food and showers, fuel and water supplies in case government officials and elected leaders were required to withdraw to the location. All images JDM Estate Agents

2

2

The bomb shelter had diesel generators which would power the electrical, air filtration systems, and communications. Subsequent to being uninhabited and neglected, the wooded ground and the shelter on Kemnal Road was sold in the year of 1998, and converted into a luxury home in just over two years.

3

3

Doors and windows were carved out of the thick shelter walls, and the bedrooms were built around a central pool that measured 25ft by 13ft.

Far from the solemnity of the furnishing of a bunker, the large kitchen is equipped with all the mod cons, and a little dining table.

4

4

While the grey might remind occupants of the Cold War period, the indulgent nature of the bathroom could not be farther from its past, it boasts an ample bath tub with plenty of room for candles and even a glass of wine.

5

5

There is also a three car garage, a games room, or au pairs suite that was added on in the most recent upgrade.

Sunlight fills the home now, thanks to the atrium-style glass roof, and there are remote-controlled lights, windows, and curtains. The owner can also relax on their wooden terrace, and dine at their outdoor table.

6

6

 

7

7

The bunker had vast foundations, and concrete walls all around, and built in the forest, the perfect choice for privacy.

Luxury homes that were once nuclear bomb shelters are not for everybody, but the unconventional space carries a lot of intrigue.

8

8

 

9

9

11

10

In actuality, many shelters around the world have been converted into homes that are on par with classy mansions. These properties are so specific they sometimes spend months or years on the market, Mail Online reported.

This bunker was a former RAF base at Caversfield, and was primarily created to withstand chemical, gas or bombing attacks, and came complete with decontamination showers, war room, and air-locked doors.

11

11

Yet, in 2014, the vast building, at one time had muddy floors, and bare walls. It was transformed into two classy, 1,400 sq ft two bedroom homes, and went on sale for $750,000 each.

Built in the year of 1969, and completely renovated to government regulation in 2012, the bunker can resist a 20 kiloton nuclear blast.

The agency said it is the only entirely renovated, and the privately owned underground bunker of its type in the US today.

It is located 45 ft below the ground, its 14,000 sq ft of working and living space, contributes to the protection from anything ranging from natural disasters to terror attacks.

The bomb shelter has two levels of underground living space guarded by 3 ft thick walls.

There are also four two bedroom apartments located on the second level, and communal areas on the first level, consisting of a cinema room.

Here is another Cold War story from us:Salvaging the wreck of one of the most feared Soviet cruisers of the Cold War

On the 32 acre site that is above ground, it has 2,000 sq ft of space, and 1,000 sq ft for a caretaker’s home.