Before Nazis hijacked the Swastika, it was revered as a symbol of Luck and Charm all over the World

 
 
 
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It has long been known amongst historians and anthropologists that humans’ evil actions give meanings or reshape the perceptions of even the most peaceful of the notions and symbols.

The Swastika Laundry Photo Credit
The Swastika Laundry Photo Credit

Nowhere this fact is more evident than the stigma attached to the Swastika symbol.

Synonymous with the evil Third Reich that wreaked havoc on the European continent, this symbol previously enjoyed an entirely different status, one that was on the opposite end of violence and mass killings.

For centuries, western civilization revered the swastika as a symbol of luck, as it was the case in the early 20th century.

Carlsberg’s Elephant Tower Photo Credit
Carlsberg’s Elephant Tower Photo Credit

The earliest findings of the swastika took place in Mezine, Ukraine; however, some of the most peaceful and oldest organized religions on the planet have long used the swastika as an auspicious symbol of luck.

Korean temple. Photo Credit
Korean temple. Photo Credit

Hinduism and Jainism had always had a very positive relationship with the symbol, their religious buildings and festivities include various forms of the swastika.

Nepalese Buddhist gompa, Swayambhunath, Kathmandu, showing swastika designs on curtains. 1973 Photo Credit
Nepalese Buddhist gompa, Swayambhunath, Kathmandu, showing swastika designs on curtains. 1973 Photo Credit

Western literature widely used the symbol and had been using the oldest term ‘Gammadion Cross’ to denote the swastika.

Swastika symbol carved on the window of Lalibela Rock hewn churches, Ethiopia. Photo Credit
Swastika symbol carved on the window of Lalibela Rock hewn churches, Ethiopia. Photo Credit

The term Gammadion Cross stemmed out mainly due to its appearance and not any supernatural meaning.

The swastika apparently makes an amalgamation of four Greek Gamma letters, that are affixed together.