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Samlesbury Hall is one of the most remarkable and intriguing 14th-century manor houses in England

Marija Georgievska

The historic house Samlesbury Hall was built in 1325 and is located in Samlesbury, Lancashire in England.

The man who built the house was Gilbert de Southworth, and the house was his family home until the 17th century. It is believed that the manor was built to replace an earlier building which was destroyed during The Great Raid of 1322 by the Scots. In the past, the manor served as a public house, a boarding school for girls and since 1925 it is administered by the Samlesbury Hall Trust.

One of the most remarkable 14th-century manor houses in England  Photo Credit

One of the most remarkable 14th-century manor houses in England Photo Credit

 

It was the home of the Southworth family until the 17th-century  Photo Credit

It was the home of the Southworth family until the 17th-century Photo Credit

Before the Southworth family, the house belonged to the d’Ewyas family. Later, Gilbert Southworth married Alice d’Ewyas, and he owned half of the house being credited for the building of the Great Hall in the manor in 1325.

The descendants of the Southworth family held the manor until 1677, and after that year it was sold to Thomas Bradyll. Bradyll never lived at the house, his main home was at Ulverston, and he stripped many of the interior futures of the Samlesbury Hall to use them there. In 1850, the building was sold again to John Cooper who turned it into a boarding school for girls.

It is best-known for the paranormal activities which are happening in its halls  Photo Credit

It is best-known for the paranormal activities which are happening in its halls Photo Credit

 

The Great Hall inside Samlesbury Hall  Photo Credit

The Great Hall inside Samlesbury Hall Photo Credit

 

The Parlour Room in the Hall    Photo Credit

The Parlour Room in the Hall Photo Credit

 

The east end of the chapel in the hall    Photo Credit

The east end of the chapel in the hall Photo Credit

In 1862,  it was owned by a prominent Blackburn industrialist, Joseph Harrison who made major renovations. His eldest son, William Harrison, lived in the manor until 1879 when he committed suicide. The next year, his father died, and the ownership of the house was paste to his youngest son, Henry.

Since 1909, the hall was abandoned, and in 1924 it was bought by a building firm which wanted to demolish the manor and replace it with a housing estate. That never happened, because in 1925 the house was purchased by the Samlesbury Hall Trust which has owned it until today.

In 1925, the hall was purchased by the Samlesbury Hall Trust   Photo Credit

In 1925, the hall was purchased by the Samlesbury Hall Trust Photo Credit

The hall was built with solar end windows faced to the east. A hundred and forty years later, the chapel was also built facing east. 60 years later, this chapel was connected to the main hall. The Southworth family built this chapel because they wanted to upgrade the house into a manor house.

Read another story from us: Castle Combe: a picturesque medieval village in England and one of the loveliest in the country

The Samlesbury Hall reflects the religious beliefs and buildings styles from the 14th century. This Grade I listed manor house is best-known for the ghost stories which surround it. Each year, 50, 000 visitors visit the hall because of its paranormal activities.