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In 19th century, Clark Stanley patented snake oil and advertised it as a painkiller, saying he had studied its wonders with the Hopi healers

Domagoj Valjak

An old saying goes, “A healthy person has a thousand wishes, but a sick person has only one.” Many of us may have heard this saying at some point in our lives, but not everyone fully understands it.

A sick person is often prepared to do anything, to believe in everything, and to try anything that could be the cure for an illness. And believing in pseudo-medicine is one of the many alternatives.

Nowadays, the term “snake oil” is used to describe solutions to problems that turn out to be hoaxes or frauds. It is also used to describe substances that have no real value and are advertised as remedies for various ailments. The term actually originated in the late 19th century, as snake oil was once quite seriously promoted as a potent natural medicine.

Various fake medicines have been popular throughout history. Until the early 20th century, there were no regulations to prohibit false advertising of medicinal products, so quite a number of people made a lot of money by selling worthless and sometimes even dangerous substances to the unwitting people who sought cures for their physical troubles. “Medicine shows” were also popular: They were usually gatherings of hoaxers who presented a variety of patented medicines.

Chinese railroad workers greet a train on a snowy day.

Chinese railroad workers greet a train on a snowy day.

Patent medicines originated in the 18th century in England, where a patent was granted to Richard Stoughton, who promoted his cure-all simply named “Elixir.” From then on, thousands of various fake medicines were distributed to the public, often supported by tons of pseudo-scientific evidence.

Snake oil was a popular pseudo-medicine that appeared in the United States in the late 1800s. At that time, many Chinese laborers emigrated to America to work on the construction of the First Transatlantic Railroad. Many laborers spoke of snake oil, a traditional Chinese remedy used predominantly as a painkiller.

Stanley as depicted on the cover of his book ‘The Life and Adventures of the American Cow-Boy: Life in the Far West’ by Clark Stanley, Better Known as the Rattle-Snake King.

Stanley as depicted on the cover of his book ‘The Life and Adventures of the American Cow-Boy: Life in the Far West’ by Clark Stanley, Better Known as the Rattle-Snake King.

Clark Stanley, known as “the Rattlesnake King,” used these Chinese folk tales to mix a tincture which he advertised as snake oil, a potent painkiller used to treat arthritis and joint pain. He also claimed that he studied the effects of snake oil for two years with a Hopi medicine man in Arizona.

An advertisement for Clark Stanley’s Snake Oil Liniment.

An advertisement for Clark Stanley’s Snake Oil Liniment.

Stanley established production facilities in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and went on to become a successful businessman. He appeared at numerous medicine shows and demonstrated the extraction of the main ingredient of snake oil. He would kill dozens of rattlesnakes and milk their dead bodies to extract the oil.

However, the Pure Food and Drug Act was passed in 1906 and many patent medicines were tested by government experts. Stanley’s snake oil was tested in 1916, and the tests finally ended his career as a prominent businessman. The analysis revealed that Stanley’s tincture contained mineral oil, beef fat, red pepper, turpentine, and camphor.

Unlike many patented medicines of the time, it contained no dangerous substances, but it also didn’t contain any snake oil and had no medicinal properties.

Snake-oil salesman Professor Thaddeus Schmidlap at Enchanted Springs Ranch, Boerne, Texas, USA

Snake-oil salesman Professor Thaddeus Schmidlap at Enchanted Springs Ranch, Boerne, Texas, USA

The government sued Stanley for misbranding the product and ordered him to pay a symbolic fine of $20.

Read another story from us:  The Hopis were dubbed “the oldest of the people” by other Native Americans

At that time, the term “snake oil” became synonymous with a hoax, and it still remains in use. Still, Stanley’s recipe for snake oil is nowadays used in the production of some contemporary capsaicin-based chest rubs.