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John F. Kennedy’s mistress was mysteriously murdered only three weeks after the Warren commission report was released

Domagoj Valjak

The assassination of the U.S. president, John Fitzgerald Kennedy is regarded as one of the most controversial events of the 20th century and is among the favorite topics of contemporary conspiracy theorists.

Although the assassination was officially proclaimed to be the work of a single shooter named Harvey Lee Oswald, the circumstances of the incident were so suspicious that hardly anyone believes this story to be true.

Picture of President Kennedy in the limousine in Dallas, Texas, on Main Street, minutes before the assassination. In the presidential limousine are Jackie Kennedy, Texas Governor John Connally, and his wife, Nellie

Picture of President Kennedy in the limousine in Dallas, Texas, on Main Street, minutes before the assassination. In the presidential limousine are Jackie Kennedy, Texas Governor John Connally, and his wife, Nellie

 

Mary Pinchot Meyer at JFK’s 46th birthday party on the presidential yacht Sequoia  Photo Credit JFK Library CC BY 3.0

Mary Pinchot Meyer at JFK’s 46th birthday party on the presidential yacht Sequoia  Photo Credit JFK Library CC BY 3.0

Bad luck followed the Kennedy family during the 1960’s, and JFK’s brother Robert Kennedy was also assassinated. He was shot to death during the campaign season for the presidential election of 1968 after he won the California and South Dakota primary elections for the Democratic nomination for President of the U.S.

It seems that the bad luck of the Kennedys also affected the people who were close to the famous family. Namely, JFK’s mistress, Mary Pinchot Meyer, was also murdered, and her killers remain at large because the investigation into her death never found the perpetrators. During the early 1960’s the tabloids often wrote of her affair with JFK, but the affair wasn’t officially confirmed until 1995, when her late brother-in-law, Ben Bradlee published an autobiography.

Mary Pinchot Meyer was a painter whose work is considered to be a part of the Washington Color School. She was married to a Central Intelligence Agency official named Cord Meyer for 13 years but criticized American militarism and the CIA throughout her life. At one point she was the target of the CIA’s secret surveillance because she associated with the Communist Party of the U.S.A. in her youth.

She was assassinated on October 12th, 1964, only three weeks after the Warren Commission report on the assassination of JFK was made public. An unknown shooter approached her while she was enjoying her daily walk along the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal path in Georgetown, and killed her with two point-blank shots to the back and the temple.

The Chesapeake & Ohio Canal from Chain Bridge at the base of the Palisades  Photo Credit  Mary Pinchot Meyer CC BY 2.0

The Chesapeake & Ohio Canal from Chain Bridge at the base of the Palisades  Photo Credit  Mary Pinchot Meyer CC BY 2.0

A man named Ray Crump was arrested because he matched the description of the suspect that was provided by the only eyewitness to the crime.

Crump was acquitted due to the lack of evidence, but the police closed the case stating that Meyer was sexually assaulted by a single individual and killed while struggling to escape to safety.

Front cover of the Warren commission report

Front cover of the Warren commission report

Many members of the public were infuriated by the abrupt closure of the case, and the general opinion among the researchers of the life and work of Mary Pinchot Meyer is that she was killed because of her resistance to the policies of the CIA.

Read another story from us: The construction of the John F. Kennedy Eternal Flame and grave site costed $2.2 million

Several investigations of the CIA’s possible involvement were later conducted by both the police and the independent investigators, but her death remains unsolved, and the CIA remains shielded by shady silence.