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Mount Rushmore was supposed to be a head-to-waist sculpture, but funding was cancelled mid-project

Neil Patrick

At first, the project of carving Rushmore was undertaken to increase tourism in the Black Hills region of South Dakota. After long negotiations involving a Congressional delegation and President Calvin Coolidge, the project received Congressional approval. The carving started in 1927, and ended in 1941 with no fatalities.

Construction of the Mount Rushmore monument Source: Wikipedia/Public Domain

Construction of the Mount Rushmore monument Source: Wikipedia/Public Domain

Between October 4, 1927, and October 31, 1941, Gutzon Borglum and 400 workers sculpted the colossal 60 foot (18 m) high carvings of U.S. presidents George Washington,Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln to represent the first 130 years of American history.

The Sculptor’s Studio — a display of unique plaster models and tools related to the sculpting — was built in 1939 under the direction of Borglum. Borglum died from an embolism in March 1941. His son, Lincoln Borglum, continued the project. Originally, it was planned that the figures would be carved from head to waist, but insufficient funding forced the carving to end. Borglum had also planned a massive panel in the shape of theLouisiana Purchase commemorating in eight-foot-tall gilded letters the Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution, Louisiana Purchase, and seven other territorial acquisitions from Alaska to Texas to the Panama Canal Zone. In total, the entire project cost US$989,992.32. Unusually for a project of such size, no workers died during the carving.

A model at the site depicting Mount Rushmore's intended final design

A model at the site depicting Mount Rushmore’s intended final design.Source: Wikipedia/Public Domain

These presidents were selected by Borglum because of their role in preserving the Republic and expanding its territory. The carving of Mount Rushmore involved the use of dynamite, followed by the process of “honeycombing”, a process where workers drill holes close together, allowing small pieces to be removed by hand. In total, about 450,000 short tons (410,000 t) of rock were blasted off the mountainside.

Mount Rushmore. Source: Wikipedia/Public Domain Source: Wikipedia/Public Domain

Mount Rushmore. Source: Wikipedia/Public Domain Source: Wikipedia/Public Domain

The image of Thomas Jefferson was originally intended to appear in the area at Washington’s right, but after the work there was begun, the rock was found to be unsuitable, so the work on the Jefferson figure was dynamited, and a new figure was sculpted to Washington’s left.