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Would You Dare To Cross The World’s Most Terrifying Bridges?

Charlotte Bond
(Photo Credit: Peter Bischoff/Getty Images) The Royal Gorge Bridge is currently the tallest bridge in the USA (and wa

It’s not unusual for someone who normally has a good head for heights to get a little bit nervous walking or driving along a rickety old bridge or one that is several hundred feet above the ground.

But there are some bridges out there that are just truly terrifying, no matter how strong your stomach. Some date back to the Stone Age while others are modern marvels, but all have the ability to make our stomachs churn.

Trift glacier suspension bridge, Switzerland

Trift suspension bridge. trift glacier. Switzerland. (Photo Credit: BlueRed/REDA&CO/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

Trift suspension bridge. trift glacier. Switzerland. (Photo Credit: BlueRed/REDA&CO/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

Built in 2004 then updated in 2009, this bridge was designed to allow visitors to view the Trift glacier from an otherwise impossible angle.

One of the longest cable suspension bridges in the world, it spans 560 feet (170 meters). Because it’s a suspension bridge rather than a solid one, it used to swing about in strong wings until stabilizing cables were added in 2009.

Royal Gorge Bridge, Colorado

Royal Gorge Bridge (built 1929) (Photo Credit: Peter Bischoff/Getty Images)

Royal Gorge Bridge (built 1929) (Photo Credit: Peter Bischoff/Getty Images)

The Royal Gorge Bridge is currently the tallest bridge in the USA (and was the highest in the world until 2001). Astonishingly, it was built in only six months between June and November 1929.

It enables people to cross the Arkansas River, which winds its way along the gorge a staggering 955 feet (291 meters) below. Don’t look down…

Kuandinsky Bridge, Kuanda, Russia

Another bridge that falls into the “don’t look down” category is the Kuandinsky Bridge crossing the Vitim River. It is made of wooden planks and has no rails along the side.

Being located in Siberia means that it is iced over for most of the year. One wrong move by car or pedestrian could result in a terrifying plunge into the icy water below.

This bridge is so dangerous to cross that those who have done so and survived have their own Facebook page.

Zhangjiajie Glass Bridge, China

Tourists walk on the glass-floor suspension bridge on the first day of its trial operation on August 20, 2016 in Zhangjiajie, China. (Photo Credit: Feature China / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

Tourists walk on the glass-floor suspension bridge on the first day of its trial operation on August 20, 2016 in Zhangjiajie, China. (Photo Credit: Feature China / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

However, if looking down is your thing, you will probably enjoy the Zhangjiajie Glass Bridge in China. Built specifically for tourists, you can cross this 1,410-foot (430-meter) long bridge and its glass floor will enable you to look down at the abyss 980 feet (300 meters) below you.

Tianmen Mountain Skywalk, China

Tourists walk on a glass-bottomed skywalk on the Panlong (meaning coiling dragon) Cliff on Tianmen Mountain (Photo Credit: Feature China / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

Tourists walk on a glass-bottomed skywalk on the Panlong (meaning coiling dragon) Cliff on Tianmen Mountain (Photo Credit: Feature China / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

If the Zhangjiajie Glass Bridge looks a little tame to you, why not try the Tianmen Mountain Skywalk? This glass walkway curls around the mountain and is only three feet wide. Walkers get a fabulous view of the Zhangjiajie National Forest Park  4,700 feet (1,433 meters) below.

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge, Northern Ireland

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge is a rope suspension bridge near Ballintoy, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The bridge links the mainland to the tiny Carrick Island. The bridge spans twenty meters and is thirty meters above the rocks below. (Photo Credit: Michelle McMahon / Contributor)

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge is a rope suspension bridge near Ballintoy, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The bridge links the mainland to the tiny Carrick Island. The bridge spans twenty meters and is thirty meters above the rocks below. (Photo Credit: Michelle McMahon / Contributor)

One bridge that has defeated those who cross it is the Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge in Northern Ireland. It is said that some of those who cross over to the island of Carrickarede opt to take a ferry back to the mainland rather than risk walking over the bridge again.

It has been fixed and updated over the years, and the rebuilding efforts in 2000 were carried out with the assistance of local climbers and abseilers.

Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia

(Photo Credit: Peter Bischoff/Getty Images)

(Photo Credit: Peter Bischoff/Getty Images)

Another bridge to hold a record is the Langkawi Sky Bridge in Malaysia. Located at the top of Machinchang Mountain and measuring 410 feet (125 meters) long, it is the longest curved bridge in the world.

During its construction, helicopters were used to lift prefabricated sections into place.

Eshima Ohashi Bridge, Japan

Vehicles move along Eshima Ohashi rigid-frame bridge connecting Matsue, Shimane Prefecture, and Sakaiminato, Tottori Prefecture, over Lake Nakaumi. Yuri Smityuk/TASS (Photo Credit: Yuri SmityukTASS via Getty Images)

Vehicles move along Eshima Ohashi rigid-frame bridge connecting Matsue, Shimane Prefecture, and Sakaiminato, Tottori Prefecture, over Lake Nakaumi. Yuri Smityuk/TASS (Photo Credit: Yuri SmityukTASS via Getty Images)

There is a bridge in Japan that terrifies motorists and is known as a “rollercoaster bridge.” Even though the area is subject to regular tremors, this insane-looking road bridge has not yet collapsed.

Storseisundet Bridge, Norway

A sports car crossing the Storseisundet Bridge on the Romsdal Peninsula in western Norway. (Photo Credit: Rich Pearce/Total 911 Magazine via Getty Images via Getty Images)

A sports car crossing the Storseisundet Bridge on the Romsdal Peninsula in western Norway. (Photo Credit: Rich Pearce/Total 911 Magazine via Getty Images via Getty Images)

When compared to Eshima Ohashi Bridge, Storseisundet Bridge in Norway might seem tame – but it’s far from that. Also referred to as a rollercoaster bridge, Indiana Times comments on how “this bridge seems to be located at the end of the world.” Certainly you wouldn’t want an accident here, so far from help.

It took six years to construct, during which time work was interrupted by 12 different hurricanes.

Hussaini Hanging Bridge, Pakistan

Built by inhabitants of villages on either side of the Hunza River with only the materials at hand, this bridge is sometimes called the most dangerous bridge in the world. With an altitude of 8,530 feet (2,600 meters), the widely-spaced planks make it a scary prospect to cross. However, it’s the only way across the river.

Rubber fig tree bridges in Meghalaya, India

A “living root bridge” in Mawlynnong, Meghalaya, India (Photo Credit: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

A “living root bridge” in Mawlynnong, Meghalaya, India (Photo Credit: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Speaking of using the materials to hand, the Khasi tribes living on either side of a waterway managed to use the aerial roots of the rubber fig tree to make their bridges.

The Immortal Bridge, China

Immortal Bridge – Mt Tai.(Photo Credit: Pfctdayelise, CC BY-SA 2.5)

Immortal Bridge – Mt Tai.(Photo Credit: Pfctdayelise, CC BY-SA 2.5)

If you found the tree bridge unnerving, how about trying to cross one of the tallest and oldest bridges in the world at Mount Tai in China? A natural bridge made of three large stones, the Immortal Bridge is believed to have been formed sometime in the Stone Age.

Sidu River Bridge, China

Fog surrounds the Sidu River Bridge after rain in Enshi, Hubei Province of China. (Photo Credit: Visual China Group via Getty Images)

Fog surrounds the Sidu River Bridge after rain in Enshi, Hubei Province of China. (Photo Credit: Visual China Group via Getty Images)

Moving on from using nature to build bridges to using a rocket is the bridge that crosses the Sidu River in China. Able to hold more than 43 million tons of weight, workers used a rocket during construction to string the first cable since the location made it impossible for helicopters or boats to carry out that task.

Seven Mile Bridge, Florida

CIRCA 1946: An aerial view of the Seven Mile Bridge, part of the Overseas Highway US 1 in the Florida Keys, Florida. (Photo Credit: Ivan Dmitri/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

CIRCA 1946: An aerial view of the Seven Mile Bridge, part of the Overseas Highway US 1 in the Florida Keys, Florida. (Photo Credit: Ivan Dmitri/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

If you’re looking for a bridge that gives you fantastic views, then you might like to try the Seven Mile Bridge in Florida. There are actually two bridges: a newer one that can take vehicle traffic and an older one that is open to pedestrians and cyclists. Both will take you across the Atlantic Ocean.

While this bridge might be pretty on a sunny day with calm seas, we don’t like to think what it’s like in a storm or a hurricane.

Puente de Ojuela, Mexico

The Ojuela Bridge (Photo Credit: By Fenerty at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0)

The Ojuela Bridge (Photo Credit: By Fenerty at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0)

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The mining settlement near the Ojuela Goldmine in Durango, Mexico, might be a ghost town now, but the bridge is still there. It was designed by the same people who built the Brooklyn Bridge, and although it has been reinforced with steel, the original wooden planks still squeak as you walk on them.